Archive for May, 2010

Working Wounded – Mark P.

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 18 2010

Goals/Limitations:
-Running Faster
-Deadlifts, Squats, Power Cleans
-No Dips, Pullups, Overhead
-KBs, Double Unders, Sumo Deadlift High Pull

WOD
Running Baseline:
Run 800m
Rest 5 minutes
Run 400m
Rest 5 minutes
Run 100m
Compare to Running Baseline Day 1.

WOD
Deadlift
2-2-2-2-2

WOD
For Time:
21 KB Swing, 53 lbs
100 Double Unders
42 Squats
15 KB Swing, 53 lbs
75 Double Unders
30 Squats
9 KB Swing, 53 lbs
50 Double Unders
18 Squats

WOD
Squat
3-3-3-3-3

WOD
Power Clean
3-3-3-3-3

WOD
10 Rounds
Run 100m for time.

WOD
21-15-9
DB Front Squat, 55 lbs
Hip Extension
Run 1 Lap (between each round)
Compare to Post.

Post all results and questions to comments.

Homage to Catalonia

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 16 2010

A good review of Orwell: A Life in Letters (the companion to Orwell’s Diaries that was released last year) in the Telegraph last week.

When I talk books Orwell often comes up. I have an (odd/varied) Anglophobe bent (Woodhouse, O’Brien, Rushdie, Naipal, Hardy) which is partly due to the fact that the language is just different enough for me to have to engage the forebrain.

Much of this stems from the musings of Christopher Hitchens. I began to read Orwell once I saw the In Depth episode on C-Span.

Hitchens was the owner (according to him) of “everything Orwell had ever written from 1984 to his laundry receipts.”

Orwell’s prose draws you in because he lays a subject bare in the simplest language. You look at the surface and it seems plain, but once you digest you realize it’s as right as it could be.

Heffer’s conclusion on Orwell’s letters: “Ah, well: it is reassuring that the gods will still give us faults to make us men.”

Goat Programming for Mehtap O.

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 12 2010

Mehtap is one of my daytime athletes and she’s been struggling with upperbody strength for a while now. What I want to do is take a good baseline, set some goals, and have a timeline for measuring again.

This is basic observable, measurable, repeatable fitness, i.e., Crossfit. It takes some thought in how to program while accounting for how much punishment each individual can take (both physically and mentally).

Benchmarks and measurement are a key component of this. If an athlete doesn’t see forward progress on a Goat, they are going to give up – that’s just the way everyone is wired. But if we’re programming well and the athlete is working hard, they’re going to improve.

So here’s the baseline, goals, and template for Mehtap’s Upper Body Strength Program:

Baseline on 100511:

25 seconds – Flexed Arm Hang
3/4 – Full Pushup
8 seconds – Ring Hold with black band

Goal by 100611:
60 seconds – Flexed Arm Hang
3 – Pushups
10 seconds – Ring Hold unassisted

Goal by 100811:
2 – Pullups
10 – Pushups
1 – Ring Dip

Template and Tracking:

The template is a 3-day rotation of Flexed Arm Hang, Pushups, and Ring Holds. The full plan can be viewed here. On the 2nd sheet, you can see Mehtap’s baseline data.

I’m going to have Mehtap (and anyone else who wants to try it) enter in there information here.

Post questions to comments.

Triathlon Training – Kristin L.

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 11 2010

Kristin has officially been crushing it. Since doing her Paleo Challenge from March 27th-May 3rd, she lost 19.4 lbs!

On top of that, she continues to PR in her Triathlon Training and her Crossfit WODs.

So all systems are firing as we’d expect when an athlete is willing to work hard.

For Kristin’s training up to this point you can check out her blog and my past programming (Part 1, Part 2)

Click here for more info on Nutritional Counseling or Personal Training and Online Training with me.
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And now, more programming for Kristin:

Week 6
Day 1 – PCF WOD
Day 2 – Tri Training
Bike 500m x 6, rest 2xBike time
Compare to Week 3, Day 5.
Day 3 – Rest
Day 4 – PCF WOD
Day 5 – Tri Training
5 Rounds
Swim 300m
Rest 2 Minutes between rounds.
Day 6 – PCF WOD
Day 7 – Rest

Week 7
Day 1 – PCF WOD
Day 2 – Tri Training
Run 3000m
Day 3 – Rest
Day 4 – PCF WOD
Day 5 – Tri Training
Bike 5000m
Day 6 – PCF WOD
Day 7 – Rest

Week 8
Day 1 – PCF WOD
Day 2 – Tri Training
Swim 1000m
Day 3 – Rest Day
Day 4 – PCF WOD
Day 5 – Tri Training
10 Rounds
Run 100m
Rest 2 minutes between rounds.
All out efforts!
Day 6 – PCF WOD
Day 7 – Rest

Week 9
Day 1 – PCF WOD
Day 2 – Tri Training
For Time:
Bike 1000m
Run 800m
Bike 1000m
Run 800m
Day 3 – Rest
Day 4 – PCF WOD
Day 5 – Tri Training
6 Rounds
Swim 200m @ 90% perceived intensity (so leave a little in the tank)
Day 6 – PCF WOD
Day 7 – Rest Day

Week 10
Day 1 – PCF WOD
Day 2 – Tri Training
For Time:
Swim 500m
Bike 1500m
Run 800m
Day 3 – Rest
Day 4 – PCF WOD
Day 5 – Tri Training
Run 400m x 4, rest 1xRun time (i.e., if 400m takes you 2:00, you rest 2:00)
Compare to Week 5, Day 3.
Day 6 – PCF WOD
Day 7 – Rest Day

Week 11 – Taper Week! Almost there!
Day 1 – PCF WOD (90% effort)
Day 2 – Tri Training
Bike 2000m
Day 3 – Rest Day
Day 4 – PCF WOD (80% effort)
Day 5 – Rest Day
Day 6 – Rest Day
Day 7 – Race Day!

Allow Myself to Introduce Myself

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 03 2010

Get to know yourself sometime. Doing some basic check ups will allow you to make much better progress as an athlete than just coming in and doing what’s on the whiteboard.

You are going to become a pretty sizeable badass doing that, but what if you could put in just a little more mental effort and get a bigger return.

This really comes down to “Goats”: What are you bad at and how are you going to fix it?

Not only will this improve your fitness generally, but it’s where I believe the true competitive nature of Crossfit is open to anyone.

For instance, I’m never going to be able to compete with Mike at running and I’m never going to be able to compete with Jon at lifting. But what if I set a goal that in the next year, I’m going to improve my mile time and my snatch more than Mike and Jon will.

That should be pretty easy right? They are both really good at this stuff, so I should, as a percentage, be able to beat them.

So it’s pretty “simple” goal, but it’s going to require that I actually work at it.

So find somebody that you want to compete against, and just say “I’m going to improve my Fran time more than they are this year” and get to work.

I Need a New Priest, and an Old Priest

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 02 2010

As a new priest, you just repeat dogma.

As an old priest, you have an idea of what message gets through to people. You can sum things up concisely and you aren’t tempted to enter into the negotiation phase:

Q: This is my goal, what should I do?
A: This is what you need to do.
Q: I’m not willing to do that.
A: [silence]

Too often, myself included, we back off what we know is right as coaches. We tell people “Go ahead and skip the workout” or “Well, if you can’t stretch every day, stretch when you can.”

If we’re confident in our prescription, we shouldn’t back off. Give the advice, then it’s up to the athlete.

WOD – Chris K.

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 02 2010

Going to stay well below max intensity this week. Pay close attention to joints/muscle that are flaming up and use that ice machine that I loaned you. Priorities for this week are:

1) Stay relaxed, the competition is going to be fun.
2) Sleep
3) Clean eating, listen to your body on amount/timing, don’t stress about it – you’re good on this
4) Therapeutic levels of exercise. Using functional movement to stay fresh and loose, not to get beat down.

Here’s your training:

WOD – Monday
A. [@75% Perceived Intensity]
[Do not even keep a clock on this, just feel it]
Three Rounds
Run 400m
10 Pullups
B. 3×10 Glute Ham Raise

WOD – Tuesday
A. Back Squat
5-5-5 @ 50% of 1RM
These should be fast reps.
B. Clean and Jerk
2-2-2 @ 50% of 1RM
C. 3 Rounds
Row 250m @75% Perceived Intensity
Rest 1 Minute between rounds.

WOD – Wednesday
3 Rounds, no time component, 75% Perceived Intensity:
20 Air Squats
3 HSPU
5 Deadlift, 225 lbs

WOD – Thursday
Travel Day/Rest Day

Give me a call to talk about this if you are feeling any issues with this stuff.

Working Wounded – Steven S.

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 02 2010

WOD
[@90% Perceived Intensity]
5 Rounds
30 Single Arm KB Swing (eye level), 35 lbs
Run 400m

WOD
A1. 4x20x70lbs DB Front Squat
A2. Skill work on Box Jump. Attempt to “hop” down off the 20′ box and immediately get back to the top with as little time spent on the ground as possible. Should be 4 sets of around 10 reps. Form more important than intensity.
B1. 3x10xMax Weight DB Overhead Lunge
B2. 3×10 Glute Ham Raise
C. 3xMax Time, Single Arm Flexed Arm Hang. Jump to the top of a pullup with your good arm, hold for max time. Note the time in seconds.

WOD
5 Rounds
AMRAP in 3 Minutes
10 Suitcase Deadlift, 115lbs
10 DB Clean, 55 lbs
Rest 1 Minute

This should get you through to Friday, 7 May. I’ll program again then.

What about this is fun?

Uncategorized | Posted by Brian PCF
May 02 2010

I was listening to the Radio Lab podcast “Limits” the other day on Julie Moss’ finish at the 1982 Iron Man Triathlon. According to the website description “Jad and Robert talk to two Ironman competitors, Julie Moss and Wendy Ingraham to find out how they do what they do. Physiologist Dr. David Jones tells us how to trick the voice in your head that tells you you’re exhausted.”

I used to watch the Ironman on NBC when I was younger, but in my twenties I was usually deployed when it aired and couldn’t catch it. This was after a brief attempt at doing Triathlon and Endurance Competitions. At the time I was following Dave Scott’s Triathlon Training, and spending A LOT of time running, swimming, and biking.

The reason I did this (and Doug and Dan were doing it too, probably for the same reason) is that this was what the most “fit” guys that we knew were doing. If you were a firebreather, if you were hard, then you did Triathlon, Marathon, Adventure Racing – that’s what the societal expectation was.

So some questions arise:

1) Are competitions like Crossfit.com programming, Crossfit Games, and Hawaii Ironman trying to make the fittest man/woman or are we trying to find them?
2) What are the psychological inputs and outputs (most of which are immeasurable) that go into which group we join? What are the inputs and outputs of those that try to do both Crossfit and Traditional Endurance Training? How do we as coaches get them to do Crossfit Endurance training?
3) [Caution: These links are not easy to watch] Does Julie Moss or Sian Welch or Wendy Ingraham look like they need to improve their aerobic capacity or their strength? What do you think their 1RM Squat is? How many pullups do you think they can do? What are the aesthetic cues associated with biological desirability that we see demonstrated here?
4) What part of the human psyche is most at work when we have athletes that say “My Goal is to be fit”, and they ignore our advice and keep running/eating high carb.

Some thoughts on Q4: we tell nearly all of these athletes to stop any and all running and endurance as that is causing a severe lack of fitness and a significantly propensity towards injury. Those same athletes ignore our advice, continue to run, injure themselves, and usually stop any type of exercise. How do we make them listen? Do we encourage them to self-select out of joining our gym by having them sign a contract that says “if I run, I get booted?” Psychologically, this attitude doesn’t make sense to me. It’s self-defeating, yet widely practiced.

When I tell an athlete “stop running” and they reply “running is my ‘Zen’ time, I feel so much better, I’m not going to give it up. Do I:

a) Fire them as my client.
b) Cajole them with clinical and anecdotal statistics.
c) Other

I welcome your inputs. Answers are not required either – ask another question to move the conversation along.